Basic Forklift Principals

Basic Forklift Principals

Understanding the stability of a powered industrial truck will be easier once you understand a few basic principles. The forklift’s wheelbase is the distance between the center line of the vehicle’s front and rear wheels. The track is the distance between wheels on the same axle of the truck. The height, as well as the location of the counterweight and the loads distribution.

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These all affect how the forklift will handle the weight of the load on the forks with the weight of the engine and heavy metal plates called the counterbalance on the rear of the truck. Think of a forklift as a Seesaw with the front wheels as the balance point or fulcrum, as long as the force of the weight and height of the load remain less than the force of the weight of the counterbalance in the rear of the truck, the forklift will not tip forward. Receiving area layout.

The force of moving, turning, and the load’s height and balance on the forks can easily tip the truck from side to side. Tip overs are the most serious and largest percentage of all forklift accidents.

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An imaginary triangle is formed on the three-point suspension of the forklift. This triangle is called the stability triangle. It is formed from the front drive tires and the pivot pin on their rear axle. The pivot pin steers of the truck and helps the rear wheels move up and down over uneven surfaces. This helps to keep the forklift from turning over.

The balance point between the center of gravity of the truck and the center of gravity of the load needs to stay inside the stability triangle. The height, the weight, and the length of the load all contribute to the stability of the forklift. If your load isn’t properly balanced on the forks, or if you turn too fast, this combined center of gravity may move outside the stability triangle and your truck could overturn.